What are some positive effects of a gray divorce?
Law Office Of Annette Baker Tree

What are some positive effects of a gray divorce?

| Sep 27, 2019 | Firm News |

More residents of Massachusetts 50 years and older are contemplating dissolving their marriage, which is known as going through a “gray” divorce. The bright side is that if you are separating from your spouse, there may be some positive effects on your health and well being. Studies show that many older individuals experience a better quality of life than if they had stayed in an unhappy marriage, as discussed in Psychology Today.

Trends and norms have changed since the 1990s as the number of divorces for couples 50 years of age and older have tripled. Roughly half of the adults today are living single, and not having a significant other no longer stigmatizes an individual. More single Americans appear to experience life positively by choosing not to be married.

Surveyed women in the 46 to 71 age bracket disclosed an association between divorce and a lowered body mass index. This could be a result of more individuals exercising, eating healthier foods and participating in the self-care movement. While these activities are not impossible during a marriage, having free time and a relaxed schedule as a single individual may help in taking up new pursuits and hobbies.

Another observed positive effect of a divorce is a reduction in alcohol intake. A three-year study of 79,094 women revealed that while they were married, or in relationships that were similar to a marriage, they consumed more alcohol and had a higher waist circumference than when they were single.

For older couples ready to split quickly and amicably, mediation may be an option worthy of serious consideration. It might help you and your soon-to-be ex-spouse to bypass the lengthy legal process of a traditional marriage dissolution. Mediation may be a way to bring about a significant reduction in the amount of time, cost and preparation required for a gray divorce.

This information is provided for educational purposes only, and should not be interpreted as legal advice.